News https://jackbloor.co.uk/index.php/news 2019-02-20T10:21:50+00:00 Jack Bloor Races jackbloorraces@jackbloor.co.uk Joomla! - Open Source Content Management 2018/19 Cyclocross, Ben Turner, World Cups 2019-02-09T22:37:01+00:00 2019-02-09T22:37:01+00:00 https://jackbloor.co.uk/index.php/news/213-2018-19-cyclocross-ben-turner-world-cups John Dalton johnrdalton8@googlemail.com <p>Thanks to the Jack Bloor Fund which helped me compete in the 2018/19 U23 World Cup series where l finished 8<sup>th</sup>overall including a 3<sup>rd</sup>place at Hoogerheide and 4<sup>th</sup>at Koksijde.</p> <p> My big goal for the season was the World Championships which was held on the coast in Bogense, Denmark. I gained selection with a 2<sup>nd</sup>place in the Elite National Championships, 1<sup>st</sup>place went to Tom Pidcock who became U23 World Champion. </p> <p>After the national championships in January I went on a training camp for 10 days with my team (Corendon Circus) in Spain to prepare for the worlds and last races of the season. We did a lot of good quality training and coming into Hoogerheide (the last World Cup) I was feeling tired due to the amount of training and travel, but managed to finish 3rd and was very close to the second.</p> <p>Coming into the worlds I was feeling good and with the result at the last World Cup I had a lot of confidence, I had a good start and was in the front group the whole race, unfortunately I had a puncture with 3 laps to go which meant I lost a few places but managed to get 6th in the end which I am happy with and now looking forward to the final few races left of the season. </p> <p><a href="http://www.benturner.online">www.benturner.online</a><br /><img src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2019-ben-turner.jpg" alt="" width="598" height="392" /></p> <p>Thanks to the Jack Bloor Fund which helped me compete in the 2018/19 U23 World Cup series where l finished 8<sup>th</sup>overall including a 3<sup>rd</sup>place at Hoogerheide and 4<sup>th</sup>at Koksijde.</p> <p> My big goal for the season was the World Championships which was held on the coast in Bogense, Denmark. I gained selection with a 2<sup>nd</sup>place in the Elite National Championships, 1<sup>st</sup>place went to Tom Pidcock who became U23 World Champion. </p> <p>After the national championships in January I went on a training camp for 10 days with my team (Corendon Circus) in Spain to prepare for the worlds and last races of the season. We did a lot of good quality training and coming into Hoogerheide (the last World Cup) I was feeling tired due to the amount of training and travel, but managed to finish 3rd and was very close to the second.</p> <p>Coming into the worlds I was feeling good and with the result at the last World Cup I had a lot of confidence, I had a good start and was in the front group the whole race, unfortunately I had a puncture with 3 laps to go which meant I lost a few places but managed to get 6th in the end which I am happy with and now looking forward to the final few races left of the season. </p> <p><a href="http://www.benturner.online">www.benturner.online</a><br /><img src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2019-ben-turner.jpg" alt="" width="598" height="392" /></p> 2018 Mountaineering, Jennifer Morrison, Mountain Leader Qualification 2019-01-15T18:41:45+00:00 2019-01-15T18:41:45+00:00 https://jackbloor.co.uk/index.php/news/212-2018-mountaineering-jennifer-morrison-mountain-leader-qualification John Dalton johnrdalton8@googlemail.com <p>The Jack Bloor fund supported me to complete my Mountain Leader Summer Assessment. I spent much of my childhood walking in the Yorkshire Dales with my family. Then I found myself working in the outdoor guiding industry and it became clear that to progress my guiding opportunities I needed the relevant qualifications. Hiking guiding was my main area of interest so Mountain Leader was the perfect starting point, however it is a large financial and time commitment. I completed my training course in April 2018 and then I used the summer of 2018 to consolidate the skills I had learnt and to practice for the 5 day assessment. This involved getting Quality Mountain Days, practising wild camping, learning about flora, fauna and weather systems, and most of all practising navigation.</p> <p>After a lot of hard work the week of the assessment came along in early September in the Lake District. After of a lovely hot summer in the UK, our assessment week had a mixture of fair weather and strong winds and rain, which tested us and our equipment.</p> <p><img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Jenn-Morrison-tent.jpeg" alt="" width="599" height="359" /></p> <div style="clear: both;"> </div> <p>Day 1 - We spent the first day starting with a day navigating, it was the day to get our heads in the game for the rest of the week. We also went through a home paper assessment we had done.</p> <p>Day 2 - We spent the day out in a rocky area near Kirkstone Pass, here we were practising our rope work; belays, confidence roping and abseiling, as well as our movement in steep and rocky terrain. It was a really enjoyable day out on the hill. The evening was spent preparing for our expedition.</p> <p>Day 3-5 - We spent on a 2 night expedition, where we navigated in the Langdale Valley for 3 days and wild camped in the mountains. We also spent one evening being assessed on night navigation until about 1am, this is tricky, but luckily we had a dry evening for it! We also broke up the hiking a little by doing presentations on topics to do with the mountains, I choose to talk about mountain birds and ecology of dry stone walls.</p> <p>Finally we returned, a little damp and rather tired but after a warming cup of tea in a pub, I received the happy news that I had passed and was now a qualified summer mountain leader!</p> <p>I am extremely grateful to the Jack Bloor Fund for supporting me to get this qualification, so I can pursue the career that interests me so much.<br /><br /><img src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Jenn-Morrison-hiking.jpeg" alt="" width="599" height="449" /></p> <p>The Jack Bloor fund supported me to complete my Mountain Leader Summer Assessment. I spent much of my childhood walking in the Yorkshire Dales with my family. Then I found myself working in the outdoor guiding industry and it became clear that to progress my guiding opportunities I needed the relevant qualifications. Hiking guiding was my main area of interest so Mountain Leader was the perfect starting point, however it is a large financial and time commitment. I completed my training course in April 2018 and then I used the summer of 2018 to consolidate the skills I had learnt and to practice for the 5 day assessment. This involved getting Quality Mountain Days, practising wild camping, learning about flora, fauna and weather systems, and most of all practising navigation.</p> <p>After a lot of hard work the week of the assessment came along in early September in the Lake District. After of a lovely hot summer in the UK, our assessment week had a mixture of fair weather and strong winds and rain, which tested us and our equipment.</p> <p><img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Jenn-Morrison-tent.jpeg" alt="" width="599" height="359" /></p> <div style="clear: both;"> </div> <p>Day 1 - We spent the first day starting with a day navigating, it was the day to get our heads in the game for the rest of the week. We also went through a home paper assessment we had done.</p> <p>Day 2 - We spent the day out in a rocky area near Kirkstone Pass, here we were practising our rope work; belays, confidence roping and abseiling, as well as our movement in steep and rocky terrain. It was a really enjoyable day out on the hill. The evening was spent preparing for our expedition.</p> <p>Day 3-5 - We spent on a 2 night expedition, where we navigated in the Langdale Valley for 3 days and wild camped in the mountains. We also spent one evening being assessed on night navigation until about 1am, this is tricky, but luckily we had a dry evening for it! We also broke up the hiking a little by doing presentations on topics to do with the mountains, I choose to talk about mountain birds and ecology of dry stone walls.</p> <p>Finally we returned, a little damp and rather tired but after a warming cup of tea in a pub, I received the happy news that I had passed and was now a qualified summer mountain leader!</p> <p>I am extremely grateful to the Jack Bloor Fund for supporting me to get this qualification, so I can pursue the career that interests me so much.<br /><br /><img src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Jenn-Morrison-hiking.jpeg" alt="" width="599" height="449" /></p> 2018 Athletics, Sophie Lee, Warm Weather Training 2019-01-04T16:54:11+00:00 2019-01-04T16:54:11+00:00 https://jackbloor.co.uk/index.php/news/211-2018-athletics-sophie-lee-warm-weather-training John Dalton johnrdalton8@googlemail.com <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Alicante Training week report</span></p> <p>After completing my final year of my degree at the University of Leeds I was looking forward to the opportunity to have a week to focus on my training with fellow athletes before returning home and starting full time work in July.</p> <p>The training began before I even left British soil. Three cancelled trains resulted in a mad dash through Manchester airport, making my flight by seconds. As we arrived late on Monday night, our first training run was Tuesday morning. A few members of the group went for a steady run to stretch our legs, exploring the local area including some trails and the promenade. In the early evening we returned to the trails for another steady run to investigate the potential for a longer hill climb route the following day. On the Wednesday we headed out as a large group, ascending the local trails to gain a great view over the bay. After a fast and competitive descent, we returned back along the promenade before ascending the final hill back to our accommodation.</p> <p>On Thursday we headed to the track for a speed session. The weather was overcast during the warmup which made for more comfortable conditions than the previous days. The session consisted of 10x300m with 100m slow jog recovery. Although the heavens opened during the session, it was nice to be able to complete a strong session with the group.</p> <p> Friday morning consisted of a group circuits session followed by a steady recovery run, and Saturday was another steady run in preparation for a harder run the following day. On Sunday some of the group decided to do another track session, however I opted for a tempo on the roads near to the athletics track, which was better suited to my 5/10k based training.</p> <p>Being able to dedicate a week to focus on my running and train with a strong group of athletes really helped me to prepare both physically and mentally for the summer races over the coming months.</p> <p>Throughout the summer and autumn of 2018 I had a number of successful races. Shortly after returning from the trip, I gained first place female at the Caistor 10k, were the 30’C conditions were very similar to those I had experienced a few weeks previous, and definitely worked to my advantage.</p> <p>I subsequently have had a number of successful races, with first female at Haltemprice 10k and second female at Deepdale Dash 10k. I was also part of a successful team at the Northern Road Relays, who finished in 6th position out of 97 teams overall.</p> <p>  Many thanks to the Jack Bloor fund for providing me with such a fantastic opportunity.</p> <p><img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Sophie-Lee-Alicante.jpg" alt="" width="573" height="566" /></p> <p><img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Sophie-Lee-Alicante-track.jpg" alt="" width="572" height="369" /></p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p><img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Sophie-Lee-10K-races.jpeg" alt="" width="587" height="587" /></p> <p><img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Sophie-Lee-Northern-Road-Relay.jpg" alt="" width="579" height="434" /></p> <p> </p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Alicante Training week report</span></p> <p>After completing my final year of my degree at the University of Leeds I was looking forward to the opportunity to have a week to focus on my training with fellow athletes before returning home and starting full time work in July.</p> <p>The training began before I even left British soil. Three cancelled trains resulted in a mad dash through Manchester airport, making my flight by seconds. As we arrived late on Monday night, our first training run was Tuesday morning. A few members of the group went for a steady run to stretch our legs, exploring the local area including some trails and the promenade. In the early evening we returned to the trails for another steady run to investigate the potential for a longer hill climb route the following day. On the Wednesday we headed out as a large group, ascending the local trails to gain a great view over the bay. After a fast and competitive descent, we returned back along the promenade before ascending the final hill back to our accommodation.</p> <p>On Thursday we headed to the track for a speed session. The weather was overcast during the warmup which made for more comfortable conditions than the previous days. The session consisted of 10x300m with 100m slow jog recovery. Although the heavens opened during the session, it was nice to be able to complete a strong session with the group.</p> <p> Friday morning consisted of a group circuits session followed by a steady recovery run, and Saturday was another steady run in preparation for a harder run the following day. On Sunday some of the group decided to do another track session, however I opted for a tempo on the roads near to the athletics track, which was better suited to my 5/10k based training.</p> <p>Being able to dedicate a week to focus on my running and train with a strong group of athletes really helped me to prepare both physically and mentally for the summer races over the coming months.</p> <p>Throughout the summer and autumn of 2018 I had a number of successful races. Shortly after returning from the trip, I gained first place female at the Caistor 10k, were the 30’C conditions were very similar to those I had experienced a few weeks previous, and definitely worked to my advantage.</p> <p>I subsequently have had a number of successful races, with first female at Haltemprice 10k and second female at Deepdale Dash 10k. I was also part of a successful team at the Northern Road Relays, who finished in 6th position out of 97 teams overall.</p> <p>  Many thanks to the Jack Bloor fund for providing me with such a fantastic opportunity.</p> <p><img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Sophie-Lee-Alicante.jpg" alt="" width="573" height="566" /></p> <p><img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Sophie-Lee-Alicante-track.jpg" alt="" width="572" height="369" /></p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p><img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Sophie-Lee-10K-races.jpeg" alt="" width="587" height="587" /></p> <p><img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Sophie-Lee-Northern-Road-Relay.jpg" alt="" width="579" height="434" /></p> <p> </p> 2018 Orienteering, Joe Woodley, World University Championships 2018-10-23T23:20:39+00:00 2018-10-23T23:20:39+00:00 https://jackbloor.co.uk/index.php/news/210-2018-orienteering-joe-woodley-world-university-championships John Dalton johnrdalton8@googlemail.com <p class="p1"><strong><span class="s1">World University Orienteering Championships – Kuortane Finland 2018.</span></strong></p> <p class="p2"><span class="s2">In 2018 my major orienteering goal was selection for the World University Championships which was being held in Finland. As this was my second year as a senior the World championships still seemed far out of reach and as such World Uni’s provided a perfect opportunity to get more international experience during my transition towards senior competitions. I worked harder than ever this winter and raced well at the JK finishing 9</span><span class="s3"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> overall in M21 Elite and finishing 12</span><span class="s3"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> at the British Long Championships. These are my best senior results to date and I felt that I had made a big step towards closing the gap to the very best British orienteers. These results also put me in the top 5 under 25’s good enough to secure a spot in the GB World University’s team.</span></p> <p class="p3"> <img src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-joe-woodley-1.png" alt="" /></p> <p class="p4"><span class="s2"><i>Exploring Edinburgh before the British Long-Distance Championships at Balmoral.</i></span></p> <p class="p5"> </p> <p class="p6"><span class="s2">From the high of selection, I found it a real battle to make it to the competition in my best shape. I was working super hard to complete my masters, with exams and coursework deadlines falling either side of the competition week. Non-the-less as the team gathered at Edinburgh Airport I was determined to perform as well as possible and enjoy the week to the max. I also kept in the back of my mind that this was all part of my development and I’d still be under 25 and eligible for World Uni’s in 2020, to be held in Russia. Whatever happened this week I would learn some valuable lessons and enjoy the experience!</span></p> <p class="p6"><span class="s2">I had been selected for the Middle, Long and Relay races. This meant that on the first day of competition I would be spectating the sprint relay and most importantly cheering on my team mates. The team consisted of Cecilie Andersen (Oxford), Johnny Crickmore (Herriot Watt), Alexander Cheplin (Edinburgh) and Megan Carter-Davies (Bristol). After Cecilie got off to a great start the team ran well to eventually finish in 4</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> place, just a matter of seconds away from a medal! Everyone was tired including the enthusiastic spectators but so proud and motivated for the rest of the week! My first race was the middle distance, held at Lapua in scorching heat! Despite starting well, I lost map contact in vague flat terrain, making a parallel error on my way to the second control. </span></p> <p class="p3"> <img src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-joe-woodley-2.png" alt="" /><br /><img src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-joe-woodley-3.png" alt="" /></p> <p class="p3"> </p> <p class="p4"><span class="s2"><i>Error at 2: Having lost direction in the flat area of light green low visibility marsh (1.) I saw crag (2.) believing it to be crag (3.) and so ended up too far left with nothing to relocate off.</i></span></p> <p class="p6"><span class="s2">I hadn’t lost too much time, but I remember feeling like I’d already thrown away any chance of a good result. I made a few more micro-errors as I rushed on, hoping to salvage the poor start. Any orienteer will tell you that you must put such mistakes behind you, it is not possible to make up lost time. However, this is always a challenge when the stakes are high at an international race that means a lot to you! By about half way around the course I made the decision to retire. My reasoning was that I still had two races later in the week and in the intense heat I would do well to save myself for those races. Afterwards I felt terrible and wished I had persevered, if only for the experience. </span></p> <p class="p6"><span class="s2">The next day was the sprint race, I wasn’t racing so took the opportunity to relax and watch the online TV coverage. The best British results came from Alex Cheplin who came 5</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> in the mens’ race and Katie Reynolds (Bangor) who came 11</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> in the womens’ race. The final two days of competition were the Long and relay races. The long race was tough, with difficult navigation, energy sapping heather and steep climbs. I tried hard throughout the race, avoiding any large mistakes. It was a much better performance than the middle but far from perfect. I finished 51</span><span class="s4"><sup>st</sup></span><span class="s2">. Whilst this was a step in the right direction I knew I could still improve for the relay race! The best results for GB in the long came from Ben Mitchell (University of Western England) who was 30</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> and Megan Carter-Davies who finished 15</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2">. </span></p> <p class="p3"><img src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-joe-woodley-4.png" alt="" /> </p> <p class="p4"><span class="s2"><i>Long Distance race at Kuortane. Photo: </i></span><span class="s5">Janna Nousiainen</span></p> <p class="p6"><span class="s2">After the long race all attentions turned to the relay. My team consisted of Nathan Lawson on first leg, then myself before Matt Elkington on the anchor leg. Nathan and I were current Sheffield University students and Matt was alumni; Sheffield Uni were taking on the world! Nathan fought hard on the first leg, coming back in 18</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> place just behind the main pack, a solid start. I felt none of the pressure I had experienced before the individual races and as soon as I started, my orienteering began to flow and I could push hard. I was smooth and able to ignore the other runners in the forest around me. My race was almost perfect, I felt like I had finally mastered the Finnish terrain! I handed over to Matt in 13</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> having made up 5 places and so relieved to have finally put together a good race. Matt was in a small group of runners from 8</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> to 15</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> place with all to play for. He raced so well, holding his own in the field of world class orienteers, eventually finishing in 10</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2">. With each country allowed two teams but with only one counting, 10</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> place translated to 7</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> Nation overall for our GB/Sheffield Uni team!<span class="Apple-converted-space">   </span></span></p> <p class="p3"> <img src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-joe-woodley-5.png" alt="" /></p> <p class="p4"><span class="s2"><i>Three happy team mates after the relay.</i></span></p> <p class="p6"><span class="s2">In typical student fashion the week ended with an awesome beer race and a great party for all the teams. The week hadn’t turned out exactly as I’d hoped but on reflection and based on my preparation I couldn’t be too disappointed. I had struggled to interpret the Finnish maps which use 2.5-meter contour intervals meaning all features on the map are much smaller on the ground than expected for those of us used to 5m intervals, standard in Britain and most of Europe. I was glad to have proved to myself, albeit at the last opportunity, that when things go right I can compete with the best orienteers. At 22 I was one of the younger runners at the competition and I’ll have the opportunity to compete in Russia in 2020. I plan to return fitter, stronger and more prepared to handle the navigational challenges that a new region can present! </span></p> <p class="p6"><span class="s2">I’d like to thank the entire British team who made this an incredible week. There was always a laid-back atmosphere in the squad with no one taking themselves too seriously, we looked out for one another and everyone spent the week laughing! Our accommodation at the Kuortane Olympic training village was incredible and we spent many great afternoons swimming in the lake and chilling out on the beach. Thanks to our coaches Mark and Alice who do an amazing job, they are always enthusiastic about orienteering and looking after their team. I’d also like to thank Sheffield University, Airienteers and the Jack Bloor fund whom I once again turned to for financial support. None of this would be possible without your continued support! </span></p> <p class="p3"> </p> <p class="p3"> </p> <p class="p6"><span class="s1">The Future </span></p> <p class="p6"><span class="s2">This has been a much belated report on what was an amazing week in Finland. Upon my immediate return I was quickly under the cosh as I attempted to finish my Masters. Thankfully it went smooth enough! The next big change in my life was moving to Australia, Melbourne to be precise! I am under-taking a 6-month scholarship as the Coach in Residence for Orienteering Victoria. This is a great opportunity for me to experience another part of the world and try to deliver a coaching plan for local orienteers. Not only is this a chance to improve others, but also myself. This may be the closest I will every come to being a full-time athlete. I have so much time to train hard, look after my body and race in new terrains, all whilst avoiding the British Winter! I’ll be back in time for our domestic races in April and look forward to another competitive season of orienteering and fell running! I hope I can end the year even closer to the ultimate goal of World Championships Selection.</span></p> <p class="p1"><strong><span class="s1">World University Orienteering Championships – Kuortane Finland 2018.</span></strong></p> <p class="p2"><span class="s2">In 2018 my major orienteering goal was selection for the World University Championships which was being held in Finland. As this was my second year as a senior the World championships still seemed far out of reach and as such World Uni’s provided a perfect opportunity to get more international experience during my transition towards senior competitions. I worked harder than ever this winter and raced well at the JK finishing 9</span><span class="s3"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> overall in M21 Elite and finishing 12</span><span class="s3"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> at the British Long Championships. These are my best senior results to date and I felt that I had made a big step towards closing the gap to the very best British orienteers. These results also put me in the top 5 under 25’s good enough to secure a spot in the GB World University’s team.</span></p> <p class="p3"> <img src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-joe-woodley-1.png" alt="" /></p> <p class="p4"><span class="s2"><i>Exploring Edinburgh before the British Long-Distance Championships at Balmoral.</i></span></p> <p class="p5"> </p> <p class="p6"><span class="s2">From the high of selection, I found it a real battle to make it to the competition in my best shape. I was working super hard to complete my masters, with exams and coursework deadlines falling either side of the competition week. Non-the-less as the team gathered at Edinburgh Airport I was determined to perform as well as possible and enjoy the week to the max. I also kept in the back of my mind that this was all part of my development and I’d still be under 25 and eligible for World Uni’s in 2020, to be held in Russia. Whatever happened this week I would learn some valuable lessons and enjoy the experience!</span></p> <p class="p6"><span class="s2">I had been selected for the Middle, Long and Relay races. This meant that on the first day of competition I would be spectating the sprint relay and most importantly cheering on my team mates. The team consisted of Cecilie Andersen (Oxford), Johnny Crickmore (Herriot Watt), Alexander Cheplin (Edinburgh) and Megan Carter-Davies (Bristol). After Cecilie got off to a great start the team ran well to eventually finish in 4</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> place, just a matter of seconds away from a medal! Everyone was tired including the enthusiastic spectators but so proud and motivated for the rest of the week! My first race was the middle distance, held at Lapua in scorching heat! Despite starting well, I lost map contact in vague flat terrain, making a parallel error on my way to the second control. </span></p> <p class="p3"> <img src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-joe-woodley-2.png" alt="" /><br /><img src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-joe-woodley-3.png" alt="" /></p> <p class="p3"> </p> <p class="p4"><span class="s2"><i>Error at 2: Having lost direction in the flat area of light green low visibility marsh (1.) I saw crag (2.) believing it to be crag (3.) and so ended up too far left with nothing to relocate off.</i></span></p> <p class="p6"><span class="s2">I hadn’t lost too much time, but I remember feeling like I’d already thrown away any chance of a good result. I made a few more micro-errors as I rushed on, hoping to salvage the poor start. Any orienteer will tell you that you must put such mistakes behind you, it is not possible to make up lost time. However, this is always a challenge when the stakes are high at an international race that means a lot to you! By about half way around the course I made the decision to retire. My reasoning was that I still had two races later in the week and in the intense heat I would do well to save myself for those races. Afterwards I felt terrible and wished I had persevered, if only for the experience. </span></p> <p class="p6"><span class="s2">The next day was the sprint race, I wasn’t racing so took the opportunity to relax and watch the online TV coverage. The best British results came from Alex Cheplin who came 5</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> in the mens’ race and Katie Reynolds (Bangor) who came 11</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> in the womens’ race. The final two days of competition were the Long and relay races. The long race was tough, with difficult navigation, energy sapping heather and steep climbs. I tried hard throughout the race, avoiding any large mistakes. It was a much better performance than the middle but far from perfect. I finished 51</span><span class="s4"><sup>st</sup></span><span class="s2">. Whilst this was a step in the right direction I knew I could still improve for the relay race! The best results for GB in the long came from Ben Mitchell (University of Western England) who was 30</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> and Megan Carter-Davies who finished 15</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2">. </span></p> <p class="p3"><img src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-joe-woodley-4.png" alt="" /> </p> <p class="p4"><span class="s2"><i>Long Distance race at Kuortane. Photo: </i></span><span class="s5">Janna Nousiainen</span></p> <p class="p6"><span class="s2">After the long race all attentions turned to the relay. My team consisted of Nathan Lawson on first leg, then myself before Matt Elkington on the anchor leg. Nathan and I were current Sheffield University students and Matt was alumni; Sheffield Uni were taking on the world! Nathan fought hard on the first leg, coming back in 18</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> place just behind the main pack, a solid start. I felt none of the pressure I had experienced before the individual races and as soon as I started, my orienteering began to flow and I could push hard. I was smooth and able to ignore the other runners in the forest around me. My race was almost perfect, I felt like I had finally mastered the Finnish terrain! I handed over to Matt in 13</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> having made up 5 places and so relieved to have finally put together a good race. Matt was in a small group of runners from 8</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> to 15</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> place with all to play for. He raced so well, holding his own in the field of world class orienteers, eventually finishing in 10</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2">. With each country allowed two teams but with only one counting, 10</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> place translated to 7</span><span class="s4"><sup>th</sup></span><span class="s2"> Nation overall for our GB/Sheffield Uni team!<span class="Apple-converted-space">   </span></span></p> <p class="p3"> <img src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-joe-woodley-5.png" alt="" /></p> <p class="p4"><span class="s2"><i>Three happy team mates after the relay.</i></span></p> <p class="p6"><span class="s2">In typical student fashion the week ended with an awesome beer race and a great party for all the teams. The week hadn’t turned out exactly as I’d hoped but on reflection and based on my preparation I couldn’t be too disappointed. I had struggled to interpret the Finnish maps which use 2.5-meter contour intervals meaning all features on the map are much smaller on the ground than expected for those of us used to 5m intervals, standard in Britain and most of Europe. I was glad to have proved to myself, albeit at the last opportunity, that when things go right I can compete with the best orienteers. At 22 I was one of the younger runners at the competition and I’ll have the opportunity to compete in Russia in 2020. I plan to return fitter, stronger and more prepared to handle the navigational challenges that a new region can present! </span></p> <p class="p6"><span class="s2">I’d like to thank the entire British team who made this an incredible week. There was always a laid-back atmosphere in the squad with no one taking themselves too seriously, we looked out for one another and everyone spent the week laughing! Our accommodation at the Kuortane Olympic training village was incredible and we spent many great afternoons swimming in the lake and chilling out on the beach. Thanks to our coaches Mark and Alice who do an amazing job, they are always enthusiastic about orienteering and looking after their team. I’d also like to thank Sheffield University, Airienteers and the Jack Bloor fund whom I once again turned to for financial support. None of this would be possible without your continued support! </span></p> <p class="p3"> </p> <p class="p3"> </p> <p class="p6"><span class="s1">The Future </span></p> <p class="p6"><span class="s2">This has been a much belated report on what was an amazing week in Finland. Upon my immediate return I was quickly under the cosh as I attempted to finish my Masters. Thankfully it went smooth enough! The next big change in my life was moving to Australia, Melbourne to be precise! I am under-taking a 6-month scholarship as the Coach in Residence for Orienteering Victoria. This is a great opportunity for me to experience another part of the world and try to deliver a coaching plan for local orienteers. Not only is this a chance to improve others, but also myself. This may be the closest I will every come to being a full-time athlete. I have so much time to train hard, look after my body and race in new terrains, all whilst avoiding the British Winter! I’ll be back in time for our domestic races in April and look forward to another competitive season of orienteering and fell running! I hope I can end the year even closer to the ultimate goal of World Championships Selection.</span></p> 2018 Rosie Watson, Fell Running, Pyrenees Haute Route 2018-10-14T16:25:55+00:00 2018-10-14T16:25:55+00:00 https://jackbloor.co.uk/index.php/news/209-2018-rosie-watson-fell-running-pyrenees-haute-route John Dalton johnrdalton8@googlemail.com <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Running the length of the Pyrenees – attempt</b></span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rosie Watson</b></span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">The plan was to run the length of the Pyrenees, following the Haute Route, which was the highest and toughest of the trails which follow the Spanish/French border from the Atlantic to the Mediterranean. It would involve navigation of 800km+ of rough trail and 42,000m ascent. I’d be going solo, bivvying as much of the way as possible, and carrying all of my stuff (up to 8 days food in places). And for the extra challenge, I had just 31 days in order to get back to Leeds in time for my graduation. </span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">It was going to be incredible! I was going to have an amazing mountain experience, be living the dream, then come back a true mountain goat with legs of steel ready to finish of the fell running season for the rest of the summer. I was even fundraising for the Jack Bloor Fund after the suggestion by Hilary, which I was super excited to do as it felt so good to be giving back to an organisation which had helped fund my trip. I promoted it all over social media and was overwhelmed by the support I had within just a few days.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Unfortunately, it didn’t quite go to plan. Day One was forecast for torrential rain the entire day. I set off in good spirits regardless, buzzing to be on Day One of my trip and knowing the forecast was meant to improve each day for the rest of the week. I ran around Hendaye in the pouring rain to find some camping gas, soaked through within minutes. There was no gas to be found, and after 4hrs of searching and half an hour in McDonalds wondering what to do, I set off without, hoping to get some on the way or to rehydrate my cous cous with cold water. </span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">My pack felt ridiculously heavy. I’d done a month’s running trip with almost exactly the same kit a year before in New Zealand, but this time my training hadn’t been good – I’d been running well a few months before, but had been limited to the roads around Leeds due to final year exams and deadlines – no big mountain days. The month before, when I’d planned to get in the longer runs, I’d been hit by exam-season flu, and had felt exhausted and run down for weeks, and as a consequence had done nothing more than short jogs the weeks before leaving in an attempt to get my energy back. A few days before leaving I finally felt like I was back to my ‘normal’ self, but I was definitely not physically prepared. By this point there was nothing I could do other than hope that my body would adapt as I went – something which is possible on a long trip.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Moving on from the lack of camping gas, things continued to just not be in my favour. It was like my guardian angel had gone on holiday and been replaced by an evil wizard. In the torrential rain and mist I took a turning which gradually sent me back around the hill I’d just been over, so I ended up back where I started – wasting another 2hrs. My map disintegrated. Over the next week it continued to rain, and there was still no gas – meaning the food I could buy was limited to tortilla wraps and pâté/Nutella, packets of Uncle Ben’s semi-cooked rice (they are designed to cook the last bit in the microwave), and cold sardines. Every day the forecast said the weather would improve, and every day it didn’t, again saying the next day would be good… There was five days of mist, making navigation difficult – after spending hours lost on a hillside trying to find the road, I realised I was just metres away but the mist had been too thick to see it. After this (and a few other times being lost in the mist), I followed roads round where possible as the Haute Route isn’t a marked trail and is often on very faint paths (and sometimes off-path), so was pretty impossible in bad visibility. This meant long days on hard tarmac in my worn-out trail shoes, which meant more impact on the legs. My ‘breaks’ where short as it was too cold to stop long, and my legs were cold all day from the rain, warming up once per night usually about 3am when the warmth finally made it down to my toes. It was hard to stay positive through days of just me in the mist, with the only company the endless cows just out of sight with their clanging bells, and every person I met didn’t speak English. I felt rude and ignorant for not being able to speak either French or Spanish, and it made the mist even more lonely – something I had been entirely unprepared for as I’ve never felt lonely in mountains before. </span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">My whole body was hurting but usually, I’d wake up the next day to realise the aches had moved to a different place, so it was just my body adapting, and even within a few days it felt more natural carrying a pack. So, when my feet/ankles started really hurting I presumed (hoped) it was another ache that would move on or disappear. But this didn’t happen and within just 5 days I had to have a rest day. My right ankle was double the size, with my left also very painful, with the tendons making creaking sounds when I moved it. I emailed Jim Davies (sports therapist and legendary fell runner) for advice and he warned it didn’t sound good, and I may need some serious rest. Where I’d stopped was a soul-destroying-ly miserable Col which was apparently right on the mist-line – the guy running the café hadn’t seen the sun since November. It wasn’t a good place to be, so I decided to set off slowly again, doing very short days – my feet had improved even in just one day of rest so I felt there was hope. And this time, the forecast said sunshine ALL DAY, even for the top of the first ‘mountain-peak’ of the trip I had the climb.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">The next day it rained and was misty – again, all day, the forecast was wrong. By the end of the day I was barely walking and knew I wouldn’t be able to make it, and had to find some way of having some serious rest. Both ankles were very sore and swollen, and my right knee now hurt too. I was devastated and couldn’t believe after all the planning and support from everyone I had only managed 6 days and wouldn’t complete the trip. I limped down to the nearest village the next day and hitched out – and that was the end of my attempt.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Despite what felt like a failure at the time, I believe it was a hugely valuable experience and taught me a lot, and will prove itself to be incredibly useful for future, bigger adventures. Things like keeping the legs warm when running in the wet, not under-estimating the importance of shoes, having enough food – all simple things which everyone knows in theory, but are easy to let slip in reality. Also, more important things like making an effort to learn some of the language in a foreign country – people have different opinions about this but I made myself swear to never neglect this one again as I found it so limiting and lonely, and felt so rude! Making sure training goes well – and changing plan if it doesn’t. Allowing enough time to start with shorter days and build up, without the pressure to do big days every day. Taking a book, taking LOTS more snacks, and not ditching the guidebook. </span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">There were also some incredible moments which I can remember so vividly – mad even better from the fact that the rest of the time it was one misty blur! A huge eagle swooped across the road out of the mist ahead of me, visible for seconds but so close – it had clearly not heard me as the mist made everything so silent. Another time two shepherds dogs sprinted barking out of the mist – I was immediately worried in case they were guard dogs, but they were so lovely and I stood stroking them for a while – appreciating that language barriers didn’t exist with dogs! They then walked with me along the track as I tried to find the tiny path which took me down to the stream. In the end, they were the only reason I found my way - the point they kept pausing at by the track as we walked backwards and forwards marked the start of the path, and when I turned down it they went ahead, basically leading me half an hour down the very steep, rough hillside to the bridge – a ‘path’ which would have been almost impossible to find on my own as it was surrounded by long grass and tussocks.<br /><br /></span></p> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Summit" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/stories/2018-rosie-watson-summit.JPG" alt="Summit" width="598" height="448" /> <figcaption>Summit<br /><br /> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="River" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/stories/2018-rosie-watson-river.JPG" alt="River" width="604" height="453" /> <figcaption>River</figcaption> </figure> </figcaption> </figure> <div style="clear: both;"> </div> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">It took almost 3 weeks to recover - luckily some old family friends let me stay at their house in the Pyrenees so I spent the time with them, helping out with their gardening work. It was great to spend time with them in their beautiful small French village, and at the end of it I was fit enough to do a 5 day trip in the high-mountains – in good weather, finally with some views! Most of the trip was over 2000m, with the first day climbing up to Pic D’Estats at 3143m which was the best mountain day I’ve had in my life, and I had the top completely to myself. Lots of big rocky mountains, snow and beautiful lakes.<br /><br /></span></p> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Cross" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/stories/2018-rosie-watson-Cross.JPG" alt="Cross" width="600" height="450" /> <figcaption>Cross<br /><br /> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Running" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/stories/2018-rosie-watson-running.JPG" alt="Running" width="600" height="412" /> <figcaption>Running</figcaption> </figure> </figcaption> </figure> <div style="clear: both;"> </div> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">I’m hugely grateful for the Jack Bloor Fund for supporting this trip, and despite not going to plan it was invaluable in my development and will help future adventures to be more successful. </span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Running the length of the Pyrenees – attempt</b></span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rosie Watson</b></span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">The plan was to run the length of the Pyrenees, following the Haute Route, which was the highest and toughest of the trails which follow the Spanish/French border from the Atlantic to the Mediterranean. It would involve navigation of 800km+ of rough trail and 42,000m ascent. I’d be going solo, bivvying as much of the way as possible, and carrying all of my stuff (up to 8 days food in places). And for the extra challenge, I had just 31 days in order to get back to Leeds in time for my graduation. </span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">It was going to be incredible! I was going to have an amazing mountain experience, be living the dream, then come back a true mountain goat with legs of steel ready to finish of the fell running season for the rest of the summer. I was even fundraising for the Jack Bloor Fund after the suggestion by Hilary, which I was super excited to do as it felt so good to be giving back to an organisation which had helped fund my trip. I promoted it all over social media and was overwhelmed by the support I had within just a few days.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Unfortunately, it didn’t quite go to plan. Day One was forecast for torrential rain the entire day. I set off in good spirits regardless, buzzing to be on Day One of my trip and knowing the forecast was meant to improve each day for the rest of the week. I ran around Hendaye in the pouring rain to find some camping gas, soaked through within minutes. There was no gas to be found, and after 4hrs of searching and half an hour in McDonalds wondering what to do, I set off without, hoping to get some on the way or to rehydrate my cous cous with cold water. </span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">My pack felt ridiculously heavy. I’d done a month’s running trip with almost exactly the same kit a year before in New Zealand, but this time my training hadn’t been good – I’d been running well a few months before, but had been limited to the roads around Leeds due to final year exams and deadlines – no big mountain days. The month before, when I’d planned to get in the longer runs, I’d been hit by exam-season flu, and had felt exhausted and run down for weeks, and as a consequence had done nothing more than short jogs the weeks before leaving in an attempt to get my energy back. A few days before leaving I finally felt like I was back to my ‘normal’ self, but I was definitely not physically prepared. By this point there was nothing I could do other than hope that my body would adapt as I went – something which is possible on a long trip.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Moving on from the lack of camping gas, things continued to just not be in my favour. It was like my guardian angel had gone on holiday and been replaced by an evil wizard. In the torrential rain and mist I took a turning which gradually sent me back around the hill I’d just been over, so I ended up back where I started – wasting another 2hrs. My map disintegrated. Over the next week it continued to rain, and there was still no gas – meaning the food I could buy was limited to tortilla wraps and pâté/Nutella, packets of Uncle Ben’s semi-cooked rice (they are designed to cook the last bit in the microwave), and cold sardines. Every day the forecast said the weather would improve, and every day it didn’t, again saying the next day would be good… There was five days of mist, making navigation difficult – after spending hours lost on a hillside trying to find the road, I realised I was just metres away but the mist had been too thick to see it. After this (and a few other times being lost in the mist), I followed roads round where possible as the Haute Route isn’t a marked trail and is often on very faint paths (and sometimes off-path), so was pretty impossible in bad visibility. This meant long days on hard tarmac in my worn-out trail shoes, which meant more impact on the legs. My ‘breaks’ where short as it was too cold to stop long, and my legs were cold all day from the rain, warming up once per night usually about 3am when the warmth finally made it down to my toes. It was hard to stay positive through days of just me in the mist, with the only company the endless cows just out of sight with their clanging bells, and every person I met didn’t speak English. I felt rude and ignorant for not being able to speak either French or Spanish, and it made the mist even more lonely – something I had been entirely unprepared for as I’ve never felt lonely in mountains before. </span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">My whole body was hurting but usually, I’d wake up the next day to realise the aches had moved to a different place, so it was just my body adapting, and even within a few days it felt more natural carrying a pack. So, when my feet/ankles started really hurting I presumed (hoped) it was another ache that would move on or disappear. But this didn’t happen and within just 5 days I had to have a rest day. My right ankle was double the size, with my left also very painful, with the tendons making creaking sounds when I moved it. I emailed Jim Davies (sports therapist and legendary fell runner) for advice and he warned it didn’t sound good, and I may need some serious rest. Where I’d stopped was a soul-destroying-ly miserable Col which was apparently right on the mist-line – the guy running the café hadn’t seen the sun since November. It wasn’t a good place to be, so I decided to set off slowly again, doing very short days – my feet had improved even in just one day of rest so I felt there was hope. And this time, the forecast said sunshine ALL DAY, even for the top of the first ‘mountain-peak’ of the trip I had the climb.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">The next day it rained and was misty – again, all day, the forecast was wrong. By the end of the day I was barely walking and knew I wouldn’t be able to make it, and had to find some way of having some serious rest. Both ankles were very sore and swollen, and my right knee now hurt too. I was devastated and couldn’t believe after all the planning and support from everyone I had only managed 6 days and wouldn’t complete the trip. I limped down to the nearest village the next day and hitched out – and that was the end of my attempt.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Despite what felt like a failure at the time, I believe it was a hugely valuable experience and taught me a lot, and will prove itself to be incredibly useful for future, bigger adventures. Things like keeping the legs warm when running in the wet, not under-estimating the importance of shoes, having enough food – all simple things which everyone knows in theory, but are easy to let slip in reality. Also, more important things like making an effort to learn some of the language in a foreign country – people have different opinions about this but I made myself swear to never neglect this one again as I found it so limiting and lonely, and felt so rude! Making sure training goes well – and changing plan if it doesn’t. Allowing enough time to start with shorter days and build up, without the pressure to do big days every day. Taking a book, taking LOTS more snacks, and not ditching the guidebook. </span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">There were also some incredible moments which I can remember so vividly – mad even better from the fact that the rest of the time it was one misty blur! A huge eagle swooped across the road out of the mist ahead of me, visible for seconds but so close – it had clearly not heard me as the mist made everything so silent. Another time two shepherds dogs sprinted barking out of the mist – I was immediately worried in case they were guard dogs, but they were so lovely and I stood stroking them for a while – appreciating that language barriers didn’t exist with dogs! They then walked with me along the track as I tried to find the tiny path which took me down to the stream. In the end, they were the only reason I found my way - the point they kept pausing at by the track as we walked backwards and forwards marked the start of the path, and when I turned down it they went ahead, basically leading me half an hour down the very steep, rough hillside to the bridge – a ‘path’ which would have been almost impossible to find on my own as it was surrounded by long grass and tussocks.<br /><br /></span></p> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Summit" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/stories/2018-rosie-watson-summit.JPG" alt="Summit" width="598" height="448" /> <figcaption>Summit<br /><br /> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="River" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/stories/2018-rosie-watson-river.JPG" alt="River" width="604" height="453" /> <figcaption>River</figcaption> </figure> </figcaption> </figure> <div style="clear: both;"> </div> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">It took almost 3 weeks to recover - luckily some old family friends let me stay at their house in the Pyrenees so I spent the time with them, helping out with their gardening work. It was great to spend time with them in their beautiful small French village, and at the end of it I was fit enough to do a 5 day trip in the high-mountains – in good weather, finally with some views! Most of the trip was over 2000m, with the first day climbing up to Pic D’Estats at 3143m which was the best mountain day I’ve had in my life, and I had the top completely to myself. Lots of big rocky mountains, snow and beautiful lakes.<br /><br /></span></p> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Cross" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/stories/2018-rosie-watson-Cross.JPG" alt="Cross" width="600" height="450" /> <figcaption>Cross<br /><br /> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Running" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/stories/2018-rosie-watson-running.JPG" alt="Running" width="600" height="412" /> <figcaption>Running</figcaption> </figure> </figcaption> </figure> <div style="clear: both;"> </div> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">I’m hugely grateful for the Jack Bloor Fund for supporting this trip, and despite not going to plan it was invaluable in my development and will help future adventures to be more successful. </span></p> 2018 Orienteering, Lucy Haines, Junior World Champs Training Camp 2018-10-14T16:12:36+00:00 2018-10-14T16:12:36+00:00 https://jackbloor.co.uk/index.php/news/208-2018-orienteering-lucy-haines-junior-world-champs-training-camp John Dalton johnrdalton8@googlemail.com <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Pre-JWOC Camp Report- Lucy Haines</span></p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1">This August, I headed to Silkeborg in Denmark with the British orienteering team, to run in the Junior World Orienteering Championship 2019 terrain ahead of next year.<span class="Apple-converted-space">  </span>It was an invaluable experience as I learnt the different skills needed to tackle this terrain. We spent the week in a hostel which was situated near all of the areas for training (and lakes for swimming!)</span></p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1">The day after we arrived, we got stuck into the Danish forests. The woodland consisted of large rolling spurs and re-entrants, with patches of light green, which was usually easy to get through. Some of the flat open forest plateaus reminded me of southern areas in the South Downs, whilst the areas of spurs and steep re-entrants were similar to areas of Cannock Chase. </span></p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1">Throughout the week we</span><span class="s2"> completed three long, two middle, one sprint and two relay style sessions.</span> <span class="s1">All these training sessions involved various exercises and different techniques to focus on which were important in tackling the challenges of this type of terrain. One of my favourite sessions was on the final day, where we ran long legs in groups, each taking different routes (or slight variations in routes) and matching the running intensity. This allowed us to compare paths options to forest options and options of going around the top of a re-entrant compared to running straight, often down a steep gully and up the other side. Often, if the forest was white, it was quicker to go straight. </span></p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1">Another good training session was the relay training as there were other national teams taking part too, like Sweden, Norway and even some of the Danish senior squad who had just returned from the World Champs. The training was set up like a mass start, with over 40 runners on each of the boy’s and girls’ course. This training turned out to be almost as competitive as a JWOC relay! Overall, it was a great week with some great people and I’m grateful for the opportunity to go to Denmark for a Pre-JWOC camp. Thank you to the Jack Bloor fund for their support. <br /><br /></span></p> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Denmark" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-lucy-haines-denmark-.jpg" alt="Denmark" /><br /> <figcaption>Denmark</figcaption> </figure> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Denmark map" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-lucy-haines-map-denmark.jpg" alt="Denmark map" width="699" height="524" /> <figcaption>Denmark map</figcaption> </figure> <p class="p2"> </p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Pre-JWOC Camp Report- Lucy Haines</span></p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1">This August, I headed to Silkeborg in Denmark with the British orienteering team, to run in the Junior World Orienteering Championship 2019 terrain ahead of next year.<span class="Apple-converted-space">  </span>It was an invaluable experience as I learnt the different skills needed to tackle this terrain. We spent the week in a hostel which was situated near all of the areas for training (and lakes for swimming!)</span></p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1">The day after we arrived, we got stuck into the Danish forests. The woodland consisted of large rolling spurs and re-entrants, with patches of light green, which was usually easy to get through. Some of the flat open forest plateaus reminded me of southern areas in the South Downs, whilst the areas of spurs and steep re-entrants were similar to areas of Cannock Chase. </span></p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1">Throughout the week we</span><span class="s2"> completed three long, two middle, one sprint and two relay style sessions.</span> <span class="s1">All these training sessions involved various exercises and different techniques to focus on which were important in tackling the challenges of this type of terrain. One of my favourite sessions was on the final day, where we ran long legs in groups, each taking different routes (or slight variations in routes) and matching the running intensity. This allowed us to compare paths options to forest options and options of going around the top of a re-entrant compared to running straight, often down a steep gully and up the other side. Often, if the forest was white, it was quicker to go straight. </span></p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1">Another good training session was the relay training as there were other national teams taking part too, like Sweden, Norway and even some of the Danish senior squad who had just returned from the World Champs. The training was set up like a mass start, with over 40 runners on each of the boy’s and girls’ course. This training turned out to be almost as competitive as a JWOC relay! Overall, it was a great week with some great people and I’m grateful for the opportunity to go to Denmark for a Pre-JWOC camp. Thank you to the Jack Bloor fund for their support. <br /><br /></span></p> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Denmark" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-lucy-haines-denmark-.jpg" alt="Denmark" /><br /> <figcaption>Denmark</figcaption> </figure> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Denmark map" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-lucy-haines-map-denmark.jpg" alt="Denmark map" width="699" height="524" /> <figcaption>Denmark map</figcaption> </figure> <p class="p2"> </p> 2018 Orienteering, Laura King, Junior World Championships 2018-10-01T21:54:26+00:00 2018-10-01T21:54:26+00:00 https://jackbloor.co.uk/index.php/news/207-2018-orienteering-laura-king-junior-world-championships John Dalton johnrdalton8@googlemail.com <p><strong>JWOC 2018 Laura King</strong></p> <p>The Junior World Championships (JWOC) 2018 was held from the 8th - 14th July and it was based in a small city called Kecskemet in the Hungarian countryside.</p> <p>My main goal for 2018 was to be selected to represent Great Britain at the JWOC. This goal had been far from easy to achieve since I had been suffering from a shin related injury since November, which had severely limited the running and orienteering training I could do.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>By the time selection races came around I wasn’t feeling confident at all. I was nowhere near as fit as I wanted to be and my shins were still not improving. I didn’t have any disasters in selection races but my lack of speed held me back leaving me on the edge of making the team. I didn’t think I had done enough.</p> <p>I had already been out to Hungary twice in the past six months for two weeks of training camps. I felt technically well prepared for the very unusual terrain, which made me want the opportunity to race there even more.</p> <p>When I got the phone call to say I’d made the team I couldn’t quite believe it. I had already started to think about what to do with the spare time I would have if I didn’t make it. Luckily my shins became less painful in the weeks leading up to the competition so I got some last minute running and orienteering training in whilst being at home.</p> <p>We flew out to Hungary four days prior to the first race in order to acclimatise and used the model areas to familiarise ourselves with the unusual terrain.</p> <p>The first race was the long distance. At 10.2 km, this was the longest women’s race in the history of JWOC due to the speed of the terrain. I wasn’t too nervous on the morning of the race because the long distance wasn’t the race I was focussing on. I knew it was going to be very fast so even if I had a clean run it would be unlikely that I would be up there with the best due to my lack of training All I wanted was to minimise my mistakes.</p> <p>I started well taking the first control steady, however my performance quickly went downhill. I started to rush and kept making significant time losses at each control. I executed the long leg well but continued to lose time on the shorter legs. I then completely lost contact with the map on the way to control 7 and ran around for a good 10 minutes trying to relocate. At this point I began to panic. I glanced at my watch, which I don’t normally do when racing, and saw that I had taken longer than the estimated winning time already and I wasn’t even half way! This being the first race of 6 I began to think that maybe it would be best to save my energy for the following race which suited me better, instead of carrying on in the 30 degree heat only to get a result I would be disappointed in. Retiring was a very difficult decision to make. I was frustrated that it had been my navigation that let me down rather than my fitness. Looking back, I am still disappointed to not have completed the course well but I think stopping the race was the right decision given the circumstances.</p> <p>I had to quickly put my disappointment behind me and shift my focus to the next days race, the sprint. I was more confident for this race but I was still nervous after the previous days result. As soon as I picked up the map I saw how technical the area was. They only used a small section of the embargo and had added some artificial barriers to block off obvious route choices. This meant you had to be focussed at all times and there was no time to plan ahead.</p> <p>My race was going well. I had navigated through the first tricky sections and I was approaching the arena run through. I made a mistake just before entering the arena but held it together. I spotted where I thought the spectator control was at the start of the arena passage. I’m still not sure exactly what happened but I must have started planning ahead, as you should in the passage where you don’t have to navigate. I finished the course, relieved to have a result under my belt… until I checked my splits. I had only gone and run straight past the spectator control without punching!</p> <p>I was in shock. I couldn’t quite believe how I had started the first two races of JWOC and still not got a single result. I had spent the whole year training and preparing and I had nothing to show for it. After a rather emotional phone call home I pulled myself together to watch my other teammates come in.</p> <p>Throughout the rest day I did my best to put the past two days behind me a focus on the Middle Distance Qualifier the next day. The middle area consisted of intricate sand dunes covered with a dense network of Juniper bushes which required labyrinth style orienteering and some thick skin to bash through the prickly branches. This was the race I had been focussing on and felt the most prepared for. The terrain suited me more since it was very technical and speed was massively reduced. In the qualifier, the competitors are split into three heats and the top twenty from each heat get through to the A final. I knew I just needed a clean run and I should have a good chance at getting into the A final which was my main aim for the competition.</p> <p>Initially when I picked up the map, I was a bit worried because there was less in the tricky bushy section than anticipated and more in the fast white forest. I quickly adjusted and tried to pick up the speed when I could. When I finished all I could do was wait until everyone was in. It was close. I was 18th in my heat so I just made it! This was just what I needed to pick myself up again and get some confidence back. I was excited for the final.</p> <p>I had a good start, taking it steady and safe through the first few controls. I caught the Swedish girl who had started ahead of me - even the best were making mistakes. I lost some time in the middle of the race when I lost contact with the map but I didn’t let it get to me and I refocused. A Swiss girl caught the Swede and I but we kept splitting and regrouping as we worked our way through the bushes. Through the spectator loop they picked up the speed and got away. Unfortunately, I started rushing and then had a big three minute time loss on the penultimate control. This was very frustrating as I know it would have been well within my ability to get a top 40 or even a top 30. Despite this I was still happy that I had given myself the opportunity the race in the A final.</p> <p>The last day was the relay. Being in the B team there was slightly less pressure but I still wanted to have a clean run and see how well we could do. My first leg runner came in quite far down in positions but not too far down in time. I ended up running on my own for much of the course. I was happy to find out I’d pulled us up 10 places! My last leg runner then continued the good work to bring us home in 20th and 5th B team.</p> <p>JWOC was far from what I had hoped for but I learnt a lot of lessons all the same. I’m extremely thankful I had the opportunity to compete as it’s given me so much motivation for next year, my last year as a junior. I’m also very relieved that I haven’t had any injury issues since competing and have enjoyed a very packed summer of orienteering including a training camp in Denmark in preparation for JWOC 2019.</p> <p>I’d like to thank the Jack Bloor Memorial Fund for the support they have given me over the years. I could not have got to where I am without it. It allows me to keep competing and training at a high level in the sport I love.<br /><br /></p> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Laura" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-laura-king.png" alt="Laura" /> <figcaption>Laura<br /><br /> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Middle distance map (1)" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-laura-king-map-2.png" alt="Middle distance map (1)" /> <figcaption>Middle distance map (1)<br /><br /> <figure><img title="Middle distance map (2)" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-laura-king-map-1.png" alt="Middle distance map (2)" /> <figcaption>Middle distance map (2)<br /><br /> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="GB JWOC team" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-laura-king-gb-jwoc-team.png" alt="GB JWOC team" /> <figcaption>GB JWOC team</figcaption> </figure> </figcaption> </figure> </figcaption> </figure> </figcaption> </figure> <p><strong>JWOC 2018 Laura King</strong></p> <p>The Junior World Championships (JWOC) 2018 was held from the 8th - 14th July and it was based in a small city called Kecskemet in the Hungarian countryside.</p> <p>My main goal for 2018 was to be selected to represent Great Britain at the JWOC. This goal had been far from easy to achieve since I had been suffering from a shin related injury since November, which had severely limited the running and orienteering training I could do.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>By the time selection races came around I wasn’t feeling confident at all. I was nowhere near as fit as I wanted to be and my shins were still not improving. I didn’t have any disasters in selection races but my lack of speed held me back leaving me on the edge of making the team. I didn’t think I had done enough.</p> <p>I had already been out to Hungary twice in the past six months for two weeks of training camps. I felt technically well prepared for the very unusual terrain, which made me want the opportunity to race there even more.</p> <p>When I got the phone call to say I’d made the team I couldn’t quite believe it. I had already started to think about what to do with the spare time I would have if I didn’t make it. Luckily my shins became less painful in the weeks leading up to the competition so I got some last minute running and orienteering training in whilst being at home.</p> <p>We flew out to Hungary four days prior to the first race in order to acclimatise and used the model areas to familiarise ourselves with the unusual terrain.</p> <p>The first race was the long distance. At 10.2 km, this was the longest women’s race in the history of JWOC due to the speed of the terrain. I wasn’t too nervous on the morning of the race because the long distance wasn’t the race I was focussing on. I knew it was going to be very fast so even if I had a clean run it would be unlikely that I would be up there with the best due to my lack of training All I wanted was to minimise my mistakes.</p> <p>I started well taking the first control steady, however my performance quickly went downhill. I started to rush and kept making significant time losses at each control. I executed the long leg well but continued to lose time on the shorter legs. I then completely lost contact with the map on the way to control 7 and ran around for a good 10 minutes trying to relocate. At this point I began to panic. I glanced at my watch, which I don’t normally do when racing, and saw that I had taken longer than the estimated winning time already and I wasn’t even half way! This being the first race of 6 I began to think that maybe it would be best to save my energy for the following race which suited me better, instead of carrying on in the 30 degree heat only to get a result I would be disappointed in. Retiring was a very difficult decision to make. I was frustrated that it had been my navigation that let me down rather than my fitness. Looking back, I am still disappointed to not have completed the course well but I think stopping the race was the right decision given the circumstances.</p> <p>I had to quickly put my disappointment behind me and shift my focus to the next days race, the sprint. I was more confident for this race but I was still nervous after the previous days result. As soon as I picked up the map I saw how technical the area was. They only used a small section of the embargo and had added some artificial barriers to block off obvious route choices. This meant you had to be focussed at all times and there was no time to plan ahead.</p> <p>My race was going well. I had navigated through the first tricky sections and I was approaching the arena run through. I made a mistake just before entering the arena but held it together. I spotted where I thought the spectator control was at the start of the arena passage. I’m still not sure exactly what happened but I must have started planning ahead, as you should in the passage where you don’t have to navigate. I finished the course, relieved to have a result under my belt… until I checked my splits. I had only gone and run straight past the spectator control without punching!</p> <p>I was in shock. I couldn’t quite believe how I had started the first two races of JWOC and still not got a single result. I had spent the whole year training and preparing and I had nothing to show for it. After a rather emotional phone call home I pulled myself together to watch my other teammates come in.</p> <p>Throughout the rest day I did my best to put the past two days behind me a focus on the Middle Distance Qualifier the next day. The middle area consisted of intricate sand dunes covered with a dense network of Juniper bushes which required labyrinth style orienteering and some thick skin to bash through the prickly branches. This was the race I had been focussing on and felt the most prepared for. The terrain suited me more since it was very technical and speed was massively reduced. In the qualifier, the competitors are split into three heats and the top twenty from each heat get through to the A final. I knew I just needed a clean run and I should have a good chance at getting into the A final which was my main aim for the competition.</p> <p>Initially when I picked up the map, I was a bit worried because there was less in the tricky bushy section than anticipated and more in the fast white forest. I quickly adjusted and tried to pick up the speed when I could. When I finished all I could do was wait until everyone was in. It was close. I was 18th in my heat so I just made it! This was just what I needed to pick myself up again and get some confidence back. I was excited for the final.</p> <p>I had a good start, taking it steady and safe through the first few controls. I caught the Swedish girl who had started ahead of me - even the best were making mistakes. I lost some time in the middle of the race when I lost contact with the map but I didn’t let it get to me and I refocused. A Swiss girl caught the Swede and I but we kept splitting and regrouping as we worked our way through the bushes. Through the spectator loop they picked up the speed and got away. Unfortunately, I started rushing and then had a big three minute time loss on the penultimate control. This was very frustrating as I know it would have been well within my ability to get a top 40 or even a top 30. Despite this I was still happy that I had given myself the opportunity the race in the A final.</p> <p>The last day was the relay. Being in the B team there was slightly less pressure but I still wanted to have a clean run and see how well we could do. My first leg runner came in quite far down in positions but not too far down in time. I ended up running on my own for much of the course. I was happy to find out I’d pulled us up 10 places! My last leg runner then continued the good work to bring us home in 20th and 5th B team.</p> <p>JWOC was far from what I had hoped for but I learnt a lot of lessons all the same. I’m extremely thankful I had the opportunity to compete as it’s given me so much motivation for next year, my last year as a junior. I’m also very relieved that I haven’t had any injury issues since competing and have enjoyed a very packed summer of orienteering including a training camp in Denmark in preparation for JWOC 2019.</p> <p>I’d like to thank the Jack Bloor Memorial Fund for the support they have given me over the years. I could not have got to where I am without it. It allows me to keep competing and training at a high level in the sport I love.<br /><br /></p> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Laura" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-laura-king.png" alt="Laura" /> <figcaption>Laura<br /><br /> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Middle distance map (1)" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-laura-king-map-2.png" alt="Middle distance map (1)" /> <figcaption>Middle distance map (1)<br /><br /> <figure><img title="Middle distance map (2)" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-laura-king-map-1.png" alt="Middle distance map (2)" /> <figcaption>Middle distance map (2)<br /><br /> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="GB JWOC team" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-laura-king-gb-jwoc-team.png" alt="GB JWOC team" /> <figcaption>GB JWOC team</figcaption> </figure> </figcaption> </figure> </figcaption> </figure> </figcaption> </figure> 2018 Orienteering, Nathan Lawson, World University Championships 2018-10-01T21:44:40+00:00 2018-10-01T21:44:40+00:00 https://jackbloor.co.uk/index.php/news/206-2018-orienteering-nathan-lawson-world-university-championships John Dalton johnrdalton8@googlemail.com <p><strong>World University Orienteering Championships 2018, Finland – Nathan Lawson<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></strong></p> <p>This year’s World University championships were my primary orienteering aim for the season and I was delighted to be selected as part of a strong British team. Having raced in Finland the previous summer at the Junior World Championships in Tampere, I was confident that I could perform well in the challenging Scandinavian terrain whilst a good winter and spring of training and racing had allowed me to develop some good physical shape. With this being my last year of university, I was determined to make the team and channelled a lot of effort in to making this goal a reality. Sheffield provides an ideal environment for students wanting to train for and improve in orienteering and fell running and I was pleased to have put almost 3 years of hard work to good use. As ever, it was a nervous wait for the team to be announced following selection races at the JK and British championships but some strong performances allowed me to be selected alongside 5 others guys and 6 girls to represent GB.</p> <p>Having travelled up to Edinburgh on Saturday the 14<sup>th</sup> July, the team boarded the plane the following day in good spirits as we looked forward to a week of racing. After a short connection in Stockholm we arrived at Vaasa before being whisked through the Finnish countryside by bus to the event centre at Kuortane which was to be out home for the next 7 days. The centre is a Finnish Olympic training facility and so provided a perfect setting to prepare for racing. We spent the following day using the training area that was provided to get our bearings and a feel for the terrain we were to be racing in which was especially useful as it was much vaguer terrain than many other places in Finland.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>I was to be running the sprint, middle and relay disciplines and so was afforded an enjoyable rest day after this to spectate other members of the team in the mixed sprint relay. As fast and furious race was presented to them with the emphasis definitely more on running than navigating and the team performed excellently to take 4<sup>th</sup> position, just +1:30mins on an impressive Swiss team.</p> <p>The middle distance race followed this the next day and it was time to start my own racing for the week. I felt relaxed and ready to take on the challenge that the terrain at Lapua had to offer. I was starting early but in the middle distance I feel that this matters less as fewer trains of runners develop than in the long distance and the forest wouldn’t track up all that much. My race began really well and I caught several runners in front of me, including my 4 minute Swiss man, however once this happened I began to race rather than orienteer and as a result my technique got sloppy. I made a rookie error on number 7 losing a significant amount of time. I then settled but again got caught up in racing later in the course to lose time on 10 and 12 after panicking about lost time before resetting for a better finish. Generally my performance was good and physically I felt very capable, however a few lapses in concentration stopped it being a really good international result instead of coming in 29<sup>th</sup> as I did, which was still good, but could have been much better. Other members of the GB team performed really well, notably with Sasha finishing 8<sup>th</sup> and Megan 13<sup>th</sup> in the women’s. It was time to reset for the sprint the next day.</p> <p>I’ve always enjoyed sprint orienteering and the fast terrain of Seinajoki looked ideal for putting yesterday’s mistakes behind me. The heat soared in the day meaning hydration and proper preparation was important but I felt that I did this well and hit the start line feeling good. Generally, it was a similar story to the day before. I had a really good start to my race, flowing well and making sure to plan each leg carefully whilst maintaining a high speed. Yet again I became a touch lazy on my planning leading to a small mistake on number 7 and a large one on 11 when I cut in to a side street one to early! Despite this, I was really happy with how I continued to push all the way through the course to finish 35<sup>th</sup> in what was a very tightly packed men’s field. Sasha had continued his strong form from the day before to take 5<sup>th</sup> in the men’s whilst Katie Reynolds kicked off her week in style to secure 11<sup>th</sup> in the women’s. As a team we were running really strongly and were feeling positive about the long distance and relay races to come.</p> <p>As I wasn’t selected to run the long race (everyone ran 2 individual races out of 3), it was nice to be able to enjoy some downtime with Sasha and a couple of the girls back at base. We followed the progress of the other members of the team on what looked like a brutal race through some physically and technically demanding terrain. It also meant we could take full advantage of the buffet lunch provided by the organisers to feel fully prepared for the following day’s relay. The long distance provided an exciting watch with Megan leading for large portions of the course just to be caught out in the final section and losing a little time to finish an impressive 15<sup>th</sup>. It was also good to see Ben and Jonny in the men’s battle it out for 30<sup>th</sup> and 31<sup>st</sup> respectively, with the rest of the team coping admirably with the difficult conditions that the race presented.</p> <p>The relay is always the highlight, team-wise, of an international week. I was to run the first leg for the B team with fellow Sheffield University and good friends, Joe Woodley and Matt Elkington. Having trained and raced together for a number of years this was a real bonus for all of us. I ran a stable race, just losing contact to the leading pack at the end as the result of a longer forked leg to hand over in 18<sup>th</sup> position, just 2:45 off the lead. Joe ran a clean race to hand over to Matt, just behind a large pack of runners. Matt went on to run his best race of the week, smashing through the competition to bring us up to 10<sup>th</sup> but more importantly 7<sup>th</sup> nation! This really put the cherry on what was a fantastic week of racing and to do it with some of your best friends was even better.</p> <p>This week is a fantastic opportunity to race against the best runners in University orienteering, but it was also a great way of meeting and making friends with people from many other countries. For myself, despite not quite performing to the level I had expected of myself, I was pleased with many aspects of my races and it provided some good feedback on what to work on over the coming months before next season. I’m really looking forward to moving in to the senior ranks and working to challenge at the top level in future years, which with hard work should definitely be achievable.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>I would like to thank the BUCS and British Orienteering, as well as the Jack Bloor Fund, Octavian Droobers and Sport Sheffield for all the support leading up to this event. Also, thanks must go to Ed Nicholas, Mark Saunders and Alice Bedwell for the help during it.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> <br /><br /></span></p> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Sprint" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-nathan-lawson-WUOCNathanSprint.jpg" alt="Sprint" /><br /> <figcaption> <figure class="pull-left"> <figcaption>Sprint<br /><br /> <figure><img title="Relay Team" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-nathan-lawson-WUOCRelayT.jpg" alt="Relay Team" /> <figcaption>Relay Team</figcaption> </figure> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Relay Start" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-nathan-lawson-WUOCRelaystart.jpg" alt="Relay Start" /> <figcaption>Relay Start<br /><br /> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Middle distance" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-nathan-lawson-WUOCMiddle.jpg" alt="Middle distance" /> <figcaption>Middle distance</figcaption> </figure> </figcaption> </figure> </figcaption> </figure> </figcaption> </figure> <p><span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>World University Orienteering Championships 2018, Finland – Nathan Lawson<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></strong></p> <p>This year’s World University championships were my primary orienteering aim for the season and I was delighted to be selected as part of a strong British team. Having raced in Finland the previous summer at the Junior World Championships in Tampere, I was confident that I could perform well in the challenging Scandinavian terrain whilst a good winter and spring of training and racing had allowed me to develop some good physical shape. With this being my last year of university, I was determined to make the team and channelled a lot of effort in to making this goal a reality. Sheffield provides an ideal environment for students wanting to train for and improve in orienteering and fell running and I was pleased to have put almost 3 years of hard work to good use. As ever, it was a nervous wait for the team to be announced following selection races at the JK and British championships but some strong performances allowed me to be selected alongside 5 others guys and 6 girls to represent GB.</p> <p>Having travelled up to Edinburgh on Saturday the 14<sup>th</sup> July, the team boarded the plane the following day in good spirits as we looked forward to a week of racing. After a short connection in Stockholm we arrived at Vaasa before being whisked through the Finnish countryside by bus to the event centre at Kuortane which was to be out home for the next 7 days. The centre is a Finnish Olympic training facility and so provided a perfect setting to prepare for racing. We spent the following day using the training area that was provided to get our bearings and a feel for the terrain we were to be racing in which was especially useful as it was much vaguer terrain than many other places in Finland.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>I was to be running the sprint, middle and relay disciplines and so was afforded an enjoyable rest day after this to spectate other members of the team in the mixed sprint relay. As fast and furious race was presented to them with the emphasis definitely more on running than navigating and the team performed excellently to take 4<sup>th</sup> position, just +1:30mins on an impressive Swiss team.</p> <p>The middle distance race followed this the next day and it was time to start my own racing for the week. I felt relaxed and ready to take on the challenge that the terrain at Lapua had to offer. I was starting early but in the middle distance I feel that this matters less as fewer trains of runners develop than in the long distance and the forest wouldn’t track up all that much. My race began really well and I caught several runners in front of me, including my 4 minute Swiss man, however once this happened I began to race rather than orienteer and as a result my technique got sloppy. I made a rookie error on number 7 losing a significant amount of time. I then settled but again got caught up in racing later in the course to lose time on 10 and 12 after panicking about lost time before resetting for a better finish. Generally my performance was good and physically I felt very capable, however a few lapses in concentration stopped it being a really good international result instead of coming in 29<sup>th</sup> as I did, which was still good, but could have been much better. Other members of the GB team performed really well, notably with Sasha finishing 8<sup>th</sup> and Megan 13<sup>th</sup> in the women’s. It was time to reset for the sprint the next day.</p> <p>I’ve always enjoyed sprint orienteering and the fast terrain of Seinajoki looked ideal for putting yesterday’s mistakes behind me. The heat soared in the day meaning hydration and proper preparation was important but I felt that I did this well and hit the start line feeling good. Generally, it was a similar story to the day before. I had a really good start to my race, flowing well and making sure to plan each leg carefully whilst maintaining a high speed. Yet again I became a touch lazy on my planning leading to a small mistake on number 7 and a large one on 11 when I cut in to a side street one to early! Despite this, I was really happy with how I continued to push all the way through the course to finish 35<sup>th</sup> in what was a very tightly packed men’s field. Sasha had continued his strong form from the day before to take 5<sup>th</sup> in the men’s whilst Katie Reynolds kicked off her week in style to secure 11<sup>th</sup> in the women’s. As a team we were running really strongly and were feeling positive about the long distance and relay races to come.</p> <p>As I wasn’t selected to run the long race (everyone ran 2 individual races out of 3), it was nice to be able to enjoy some downtime with Sasha and a couple of the girls back at base. We followed the progress of the other members of the team on what looked like a brutal race through some physically and technically demanding terrain. It also meant we could take full advantage of the buffet lunch provided by the organisers to feel fully prepared for the following day’s relay. The long distance provided an exciting watch with Megan leading for large portions of the course just to be caught out in the final section and losing a little time to finish an impressive 15<sup>th</sup>. It was also good to see Ben and Jonny in the men’s battle it out for 30<sup>th</sup> and 31<sup>st</sup> respectively, with the rest of the team coping admirably with the difficult conditions that the race presented.</p> <p>The relay is always the highlight, team-wise, of an international week. I was to run the first leg for the B team with fellow Sheffield University and good friends, Joe Woodley and Matt Elkington. Having trained and raced together for a number of years this was a real bonus for all of us. I ran a stable race, just losing contact to the leading pack at the end as the result of a longer forked leg to hand over in 18<sup>th</sup> position, just 2:45 off the lead. Joe ran a clean race to hand over to Matt, just behind a large pack of runners. Matt went on to run his best race of the week, smashing through the competition to bring us up to 10<sup>th</sup> but more importantly 7<sup>th</sup> nation! This really put the cherry on what was a fantastic week of racing and to do it with some of your best friends was even better.</p> <p>This week is a fantastic opportunity to race against the best runners in University orienteering, but it was also a great way of meeting and making friends with people from many other countries. For myself, despite not quite performing to the level I had expected of myself, I was pleased with many aspects of my races and it provided some good feedback on what to work on over the coming months before next season. I’m really looking forward to moving in to the senior ranks and working to challenge at the top level in future years, which with hard work should definitely be achievable.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>I would like to thank the BUCS and British Orienteering, as well as the Jack Bloor Fund, Octavian Droobers and Sport Sheffield for all the support leading up to this event. Also, thanks must go to Ed Nicholas, Mark Saunders and Alice Bedwell for the help during it.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> <br /><br /></span></p> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Sprint" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-nathan-lawson-WUOCNathanSprint.jpg" alt="Sprint" /><br /> <figcaption> <figure class="pull-left"> <figcaption>Sprint<br /><br /> <figure><img title="Relay Team" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-nathan-lawson-WUOCRelayT.jpg" alt="Relay Team" /> <figcaption>Relay Team</figcaption> </figure> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Relay Start" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-nathan-lawson-WUOCRelaystart.jpg" alt="Relay Start" /> <figcaption>Relay Start<br /><br /> <figure class="pull-left"><img title="Middle distance" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-nathan-lawson-WUOCMiddle.jpg" alt="Middle distance" /> <figcaption>Middle distance</figcaption> </figure> </figcaption> </figure> </figcaption> </figure> </figcaption> </figure> <p><span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p> </p> 2018 Mountaineering, Liam Rowe, Climbing Wall Instructor 2018-07-04T19:55:22+00:00 2018-07-04T19:55:22+00:00 https://jackbloor.co.uk/index.php/news/205-2018-mountaineering-liam-rowe-climbing-wall-instructor John Dalton johnrdalton8@googlemail.com <p>Liam Rowe, Climbing Wall Instructor</p> <p>Having Initially applied to the Jack Bloor Fund for funding to help with the cost of completing a Single Pitch Award in order to help the University Mountaineering society, I was delighted to learn that the trust awarded me £50 in order to help pay towards the cost of the single pitch award. I then spoke to the student union , and after multiple dicussions, we decided that a Climbing Wall Award would be more appropriate to suit the ability of the members of the Mountaineering.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>Therefore I used some of the time afterwards to meet the prerequisites which are needed in order to attend the CWA training course, which are 15 lead climbs and visits to 4 different public Climbing Walls. <span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>Once I had got up to the perquisites required to attend the training course , I booked onto a training course at the Boardroom Climbing Centre in Queensferry, North Wales . In recent months Mountain Training have changed the name of Climbing Wall Award to Climbing Wall Instructor.</p> <p>The training course I attended was the first course to be under the CWI scheme, on the training course which was over two days we covered the syllabus which incorporated<span class="Apple-converted-space">  </span>things such as group management skills, lead belaying, the training course also included the abseil module so on the second day we went through the process of rigging an abseil and how to keep a group safe at the top of an abseil, we also went through tope rope belay techniques and then did some personal abseils and also some problem solving techniques.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>The past few months I have been using as the consolidation period leading up to assessment in order to meet the requirements for the assessment, I am booked onto an assessment on the 30<sup>th</sup> July so all being well I should hold the award in time to use with the University Mountaineering society.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>I am very grateful to the Jack Bloor Fund for deciding to award funds to myself as it greatly helped with paying towards the cost of the CWA/CWI scheme.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> <br /><img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Liam-Rowe-1.jpeg" alt="" /><br /><img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Liam-Rowe-2.jpeg" alt="" /><br /><img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Liam-Rowe-3.jpeg" width="720" /><br /></span></p> <p>Liam Rowe, Climbing Wall Instructor</p> <p>Having Initially applied to the Jack Bloor Fund for funding to help with the cost of completing a Single Pitch Award in order to help the University Mountaineering society, I was delighted to learn that the trust awarded me £50 in order to help pay towards the cost of the single pitch award. I then spoke to the student union , and after multiple dicussions, we decided that a Climbing Wall Award would be more appropriate to suit the ability of the members of the Mountaineering.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>Therefore I used some of the time afterwards to meet the prerequisites which are needed in order to attend the CWA training course, which are 15 lead climbs and visits to 4 different public Climbing Walls. <span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>Once I had got up to the perquisites required to attend the training course , I booked onto a training course at the Boardroom Climbing Centre in Queensferry, North Wales . In recent months Mountain Training have changed the name of Climbing Wall Award to Climbing Wall Instructor.</p> <p>The training course I attended was the first course to be under the CWI scheme, on the training course which was over two days we covered the syllabus which incorporated<span class="Apple-converted-space">  </span>things such as group management skills, lead belaying, the training course also included the abseil module so on the second day we went through the process of rigging an abseil and how to keep a group safe at the top of an abseil, we also went through tope rope belay techniques and then did some personal abseils and also some problem solving techniques.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>The past few months I have been using as the consolidation period leading up to assessment in order to meet the requirements for the assessment, I am booked onto an assessment on the 30<sup>th</sup> July so all being well I should hold the award in time to use with the University Mountaineering society.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>I am very grateful to the Jack Bloor Fund for deciding to award funds to myself as it greatly helped with paying towards the cost of the CWA/CWI scheme.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> <br /><img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Liam-Rowe-1.jpeg" alt="" /><br /><img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Liam-Rowe-2.jpeg" alt="" /><br /><img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Liam-Rowe-3.jpeg" width="720" /><br /></span></p> 2018 Rock Climbing, Oliver Knox-Renshaw, BMC Youth Championships 2018-06-29T23:34:08+00:00 2018-06-29T23:34:08+00:00 https://jackbloor.co.uk/index.php/news/204-2018-rock-climbing-oliver-knox-renshaw-bmc-youth-championships John Dalton johnrdalton8@googlemail.com <img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Oliver-KR-1.png" alt="" /><img class="pull-right" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Oliver-KR-2.png" alt="" /><img class="pull-right" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Oliver-KR-3.png" alt="" /><br /> <div><br /> <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="section"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p style="text-align: right;">Ouch!!!!</p> <p style="text-align: right;">A broken finger caused a few issues earlier this year . . but not for too long!</p> <p style="text-align: right;">Oliver was soon back in business after careful assessment and a recovery program and is now training hard again at full strength.</p> <p style="text-align: right;">Main picture: Oliver from the team shoot earlier this year aged 9.<br /><br /></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div style="clear: both;"> </div> Oliver and I would both like to begin by saying a huge thank you to Alan Manson, Hilary Bloor and the Jack Bloor funding program for helping to make Oliver’s dream of becoming a world class competition climber one step closer to becoming a reality. With the help and generosity of these people, Oliver will shortly have a completed training facility at home so he can train every day for his life’s passion of climbing.<br /><br />Read the full article <a href="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/files/2018-Oliver-KR.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">here</a> (pdf)<br /><br /></div> <img class="pull-left" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Oliver-KR-1.png" alt="" /><img class="pull-right" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Oliver-KR-2.png" alt="" /><img class="pull-right" src="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/images/2018-Oliver-KR-3.png" alt="" /><br /> <div><br /> <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="section"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p style="text-align: right;">Ouch!!!!</p> <p style="text-align: right;">A broken finger caused a few issues earlier this year . . but not for too long!</p> <p style="text-align: right;">Oliver was soon back in business after careful assessment and a recovery program and is now training hard again at full strength.</p> <p style="text-align: right;">Main picture: Oliver from the team shoot earlier this year aged 9.<br /><br /></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div style="clear: both;"> </div> Oliver and I would both like to begin by saying a huge thank you to Alan Manson, Hilary Bloor and the Jack Bloor funding program for helping to make Oliver’s dream of becoming a world class competition climber one step closer to becoming a reality. With the help and generosity of these people, Oliver will shortly have a completed training facility at home so he can train every day for his life’s passion of climbing.<br /><br />Read the full article <a href="https://www.jackbloor.co.uk/files/2018-Oliver-KR.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">here</a> (pdf)<br /><br /></div>